8. Heritage, Arts & Culture

Opendate_range26 Jul, 2021, 9:00am - 4 Oct, 2021, 4:00pm


 PDF version

Introduction

8.1

Heritage is defined in a wide-ranging manner as including monuments, archaeological objects, heritage objects such as art and industrial works, documents and genealogical records, architectural heritage, intangible heritage, flora, fauna, wildlife habitats, landscapes, seascapes, wrecks, geology, heritage parks and gardens and inland waterways. Heritage is a community’s unique expression of what is valued, responding to the landscape, available resources, influences and activities.  It is important for emotional and mental wellbeing, sense of identity and belonging and a point of integration and engagement for visitors and newcomers. 

8.2

Cork City’s Culture links us to where we come from and shapes an understanding of our city as a unique and special place. Cork’s unique cultural identity is distinct yet evolving and is shaped by our diverse communities.  The preservation of Cork’s cultural heritage and cultivation of our cultural identity makes the city an attractive and vibrant place to live, work, study and visit.  Cork City Council has an important role to play in ensuring that the city’s culture is valued.


8.3

Cork City Council is committed to identifying, protecting and celebrating Corks unique historic and contemporary cultural expression.

Key objectives of Cork City Council are:
• To promote and celebrate Cork City as a centre of excellence for arts, culture as well as the creative industries;
• To support the further development of Cork as a centre for culture and creativity;
• To ensure that the nurturing of the arts and associated services is part of the planned development of Cork City and its surrounding region;
• To facilitate and encourage sustainable tourism development which is based on and reflects the city’s distinctive history culture and environment, and which will promote diversification and innovation in the tourism sector;
• To protect and enhance the tourism and cultural amenities of the city including the conservation, protection and enhancement of Cork City’s natural, built and cultural heritage through land use zoning, policies and objectives;
• To develop the city’s distinctive qualities and its function as a cultural location;
• To expand the role of the city as an important gateway and base for regional tourism.
• To promote the protection of the heritage of the city and the implementation of the Heritage and Biodiversity Plan;
• To ensure that elements of archaeological, architectural and other cultural significance are identified, retained and interpreted wherever possible and the knowledge placed in the public domain;
• To promote the retention, reuse and enhancement of buildings and other elements of architectural or other significance;
• To ensure that development reflects and is sensitive to the historical importance and character of the city, in particular the street layout and pattern, plot sizes, building heights and scales;
• To improve and encourage access to and understanding of the architectural heritage of the city; and
• To protect, promote and conserve Cork City’s natural heritage.


8.4

These are the primary statutory instruments relating to heritage:
• Planning and Development Act 2000, as amended
• The protection of archaeological heritage, structures and areas of special interest, the preservation of the character of the landscape, views and prospects are a requirement of development plans.
• The National Monuments Acts 1930 – 2004
• These Acts provide for the protection of Ireland’s archaeological heritage.


8.5

The Government has signed and ratified a number of International and European Conventions, which have guided the formulation of national legislation and national and regional policy to protect the built and natural heritage.
• The Convention for the Protection of the Architectural Heritage of Europe, 1985 - the Granada Convention (ETS No. 121)
• This Convention was ratified by Ireland in 1997 and recognises that architectural heritage constitutes an irreplaceable expression of the richness and diversity of Europe’s cultural heritage which fosters the economic, social and cultural development of states and regions.
• The European Convention on the Protection of the Archaeological Heritage, 1992 - the Valletta Convention (ETS No. 143)
• The Convention provides the basic framework for policy on the protection of archaeological heritage as a source of the European collective memory.
• Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-Making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters, 1998 - the Aarhus Convention
The Aarhus Convention lays down a set of basic roles to promote citizens’ involvement in environmental matters and improve enforcement of environmental Law.
• European Landscape Convention, 2000 – the Florence Convention (ETS No. 176) This Convention defines landscape as ‘…an area, as perceived by people, whose character is the result of the action and interaction of natural and/or human factors’ and applies to both rural and urban landscapes.

8.6

These policy frameworks and guidelines set the context for this Plan:
• Framework and Principles for the Protection of the Archaeological Heritage (1999); Policy and Guidance on Archaeological Excavation (1999)
• This Framework stipulates the basic principles for the protection of archaeological heritage.
• Government Policy on Architecture 2009-2015 This policy recognised the place of architecture in society as an expression of cultural, aesthetic and social values both past and present.
• The Architectural Heritage Protection Guidelines 2011
These Guidelines relate to protecting structures of special architectural, historical, archaeological, artistic, cultural, scientific, social or technical interest, and preserving the character of architectural conservation areas.

Archaeology

8.7

The archaeological heritage of an area includes monuments, sites, and objects whether situated on land or under water. Cork City has a significant archaeological heritage, that provides a valuable cultural, educational and tourism resource.

8.8

Cork city is one of the oldest cities in Ireland and has a rich archaeological record. There are few surviving ancient monuments above ground in the city; however, the buried archaeology of Cork embraces every era of Cork’s development. For example, recent archaeological excavations in the South Main Street area of the city centre have contributed greatly to our knowledge of the late Viking period in Cork (11th century), known as the Hiberno-Norse period. Above ground there are only a few surviving medieval and early post-medieval structures such as Red Abbey Tower and Elizabeth Fort.

8.9

Within the City there are also a number of church and graveyard sites many of which are important in that they are active cemetery sites but also contain important archaeological features and structures. In particular many old burial grounds covered areas greater than their contemporary enclosures, consequently human burials occur beneath some of the City’s streets and houses.

8.10

Cork’s pre-eminence as a trading centre and maritime merchant port in the eighteenth and nineteenth century has created industrial archaeology and historic remains which still survive in the contemporary city e.g., Butter Market in Shandon and the Bonded Warehouses in the Port of Cork. The nearby riverside villages of Douglas and Glanmire also have a range of mill complexes. The gunpowder mills in Ballincollig with its combination of size (53 hectares), range of surviving buildings and canal system make it a is a unique industrial heritage site.

8.11

Cork city centre has 60 archaeological sites ranging from a prehistoric standing stone to the medieval city wall. In addition, the towns, villages and hinterland of the city have c.400 sites (as listed in the Recorded Monuments and Places RMP). These sites range from prehistoric fulacth fiadh cooking sites to large castle sites, such as Blarney Castle.

Arts and Culture

8.12

Arts and culture help to underpin a city’s sense of place and enhances its quality of life and attractiveness as a place in which to live and to visit. Cork City’s rich arts and cultural sector spans across all art forms and practices and caters to all residents and visitors to the city.

8.13

The City boasts a range of performance venues and cultural facilities, some of which have been developed by Cork City Council, such as Triskel Chirstchurch and many other venues and organisations that receive financial and other support.

8.14

Cork City Council acknowledges the important contribution of the arts to the city’s unique cultural identity and the potential of the arts and creativity as a driver of social and economic development. The arts are central to the vibrancy of the city and can serve to give a voice to the many cultures in the city. The strengths of Cork’s arts and cultural sector lie in its people and organisations. By investing in their development, Cork will grow its cultural capacity and enhance its attractiveness and vibrancy.

8.15

Cork City Council will implement its Arts and Culture Strategy for the period 2021-2025. This Strategy will aim to:
• Support the sustainability of the arts and cultural sector through post-pandemic recovery;
• Develop the arts and cultural needs of the expanding city demographic; and
• Support arts and cultural development that is representative of the full diversity for the city’s population.

8.16

In addition to providing and developing physical space for the arts in Cork, there is potential to protect, enhance and market the city’s natural assets, as well as outdoor public realm spaces for artistic facilities and festivals/events to the benefit of both citizen and tourist alike. Cork City Council recognises that well-designed, flexible public space that can be animated by the arts and cultural can have cross-cutting benefits to public amenity, tourism and the night-time economy.

8.17

Cork City is host to more than 24 festivals each year. Cork Midsummer Festival, Cork Film Festival, Cork International Choral Festival, World Book Festival, Cork Short Story Festival, and Cork Folk Festival are some of the festivals that have earned Cork a reputation as a City of Festivals. The contribution of such events adds to the vibrancy and attractiveness of the city for residents and visitors alike. In addition to other supports, Cork City Council facilitates the use of the public realm, including streets and parks, for these festivals.

Built Heritage

8.18

Cork’s built heritage contributes significantly to the city’s identity and the richness and diversity of its urban fabric. The street pattern, local architectural building styles, the form of buildings and spaces, civic buildings, medieval streetscape, the Georgian urban extension, and areas of Victorian architecture along with our industrial heritage and distinctive 20th Century architecture contribute to creating the sense of place.

8.19

Protected Structures and Recorded Monuments are protected through national legislation. Policy delivery in this Plan is through the development management planning process and through the Cork City Council Heritage and Biodiversity Plan.

8.20

Sympathetic maintenance, adaptation and re-use can allow architectural heritage to yield aesthetic, environmental and economic benefits to the city, even when the original use may no longer be viable. Conservation can be recognised as a good environmental choice as the reuse of buildings rather than their demolition contributes to sustainability by retaining the embodied energy of buildings and reducing demolition waste. In some cases, it is also more cost effective to renovate than demolish and rebuild.


8.21

A Protected Structure is a structure which is considered to be of special interest from an architectural, historical, archaeological, artistic, cultural, scientific, social, or technical point of view. The Record of Protected Structures (RPS) is a list of the buildings held by a local authority which contains buildings considered to be of special interest in its operational area. Further information on Protected Structures is available in the publication A Guide to Protected Structures in Cork City while the Record of Protected Structures is contained in Volume 3 of this Plan.

8.22

The effect of the designation of Protected Structure status is to ensure that any changes or alterations to the character of the building are carried out in such a way that the existing special character is retained and enhanced. Therefore, works that would in the opinion of the City Council, have a material effect on the character of the structure, require planning permission.

8.23

Demolition of a Protected Structure will not be permitted except in exceptional circumstances.

8.24

Where it is proposed to alter or demolish a Protected Structure, either partially or totally, a full record of the structure and its significant elements shall be prepared to best conservation practice.

8.25

Any proposals for alterations or extensions to a Protected Structure should ensure that there is no damage to the special character of the Protected Structure. Any extensions should be appropriate in terms of architectural design, treatment, character, scale and form to the existing protected structure.

8.26

Curtilage is normally taken to be the parcel of grounds associated with the protected structure. Attendant grounds are those areas that may not be immediate to the protected structure but are associated with them. Both the curtilage and attendant grounds of a Protected Structure are included for their protection within the definition of a Protected Structure as they are defining elements of the structure.

8.27

Historic landscapes and gardens associated with Protected Structures are also an important amenity and contribute to the setting and character of Protected Structures. Cork City Council will seek to protect these unique historic gardens (including walled gardens), landscapes and settings from inappropriate development. There are also remnant historic landscapes that do not relate to protected structures that are built heritage assets of significance that Cork City Council will seek to protect. These in general relate to the former grounds of historic houses, some of which have been lost, others are not included on the Record of Protected Structures.

8.28

Development which would not conflict with the general planning objectives for the area in which a Protected Structure is located will be considered on its merits and on the impact such development would have on the character of the Protected Structure.



8.29

Under Section 53 of the Planning Acts, the relevant Minister may make recommendations to Cork City Council to consider the designation of the buildings and gardens listed in the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage as Protected Structures.

8.30

The City Council will have regard to the ministerial recommendations and will consider the structures listed in the NIAH for protection, by designation of Protected Structures, by the adoption of Architectural Conservation Areas to protect groups of buildings, or by whatever other means the Council considers will most effectively protect the architectural heritage of the City.

8.31

Cork City Council will seek to engage with key stakeholder groups, including public representatives, building owners and the public to develop the most appropriate response for the protection of specific buildings, groups of buildings and historic areas.


8.32

Cork City Council will seek to preserve and enhance the special character of areas by the designation of Architectural Conservation Areas under Section 81 of the Planning and Development Act. Historic urban areas and landscapes can be also designated for protection as Architectural Conservation Areas. The special character of such areas is described in the relevant ‘statement of character’ in Volume 3 of this Plan. Changes that materially affect the character of an Architectural Conservation Area will require planning permission.

8.33

It important to recognise that historic urban areas and designed landscapes are not to be preserved. Alterations and extensions to existing structures, the redevelopment of redundant sites and the intensification of uses will occur responding to economic and social changes as the city evolves.

8.34

The designation of such areas as Architectural Conservation Areas seeks to protect the exiting qualities as part of the evolving development process and to ensure that new development responds to the historic environment in a way that contributes new values from our own time.

8.35

The designation of Architectural Conservation Areas is intended to encourage development in historic areas that promotes a high standard of design and detail, enhancing Cork City’s existing historic morphology, varied architectural styles and use of materials, but which adds new qualities from our own time, making its own contribution to the city’s evolving identity.

8.36

New development in Architectural Conservation Areas should have regard to existing patterns of development, the city’s characteristic architectural forms and distinctive use of materials. However, it is expected that new development should generally reflect contemporary architectural practice, and not aim to mimic historic building styles.

8.37

Cork City Council will assist owners / managers with conservation advice and, subject to professional and financial capacity, by means of other supports, including by the operation of targeted grant schemes, such as the Architectural Conservation Area Grant Scheme, or other grants or tax incentives provided locally or nationally.

8.38

Historic Street Character Areas include a number of older residential areas located outside of the City Centre. Generally urban vernacular in character, they consist of former rural villages, historic city approaches or groups of historic housing. The areas have street frontages and groups of buildings of architectural and social interest in terms of group value, building volume, roof types, and elevational treatments. They are identified in the Appendices of this Plan.

8.39

The farmhouses, cottages, stone walls and other local features which predate the suburban expansion of the city and towns within the city boundary contribute to the character and sense of place of the area. There will be a presumption against the demolition of such structures of vernacular or historic / social interest which contribute to the character and identity of an area. Their re-use should be prioritised.

8.40

Many non-structural elements such as curtilage features, historic gardens, stone walls, historic ironwork, plaques and street furniture (post boxes, horse troughs, mooring bollards and quayside features, historic ironwork etc.) form an integral part of the urban landscape or provide significant historic references which contribute to the identity of the city and its hinterland. Cork City Council will seek to protect important elements of the built heritage and their settings as appropriate.

Community Cultural Assetts and Services


8.41

Cork City and County Archives Service (CCCAS) is operated by Cork City Council and provided in partnership with Cork County Council and University College Cork. CCCAS is responsible for preserving and making accessible Cork’s archival and documentary heritage. The CCCAS collection is one of Cork’s largest and most important cultural heritage and information assets, documenting many aspects of the social, political, commercial and cultural history of Cork. CCCAS plays a key role in the cultural life of the city and county by facilitating research, supporting learning, promoting awareness of Cork’s local history and heritage, and by supporting societal memory, democracy and public administration. Cork City Council will continue to support the development of the City Archives.

8.42

The Library service has been central to the cultural, social and educational life of the city for almost 130 years. With a network of 10 libraries, in 2019 the library services issued 919,161 physical items and downloads , hosted, 805,422 visits and provided access to 120 public computers All of our librariesare key components of the communities they serve and are accessible and welcoming spaces to the city’s diverse population, maintaining a balance between printed and digital resources and providing safe spaces for all ages to meet and learn. The feasibility of developing a new state-of-the-art City Library is actively being investigated, as well as the provision of a purpose-built community library in the Blackrock / Mahon area and the refurbishment of the community library in Mayfield. See Chapter 3 Delivering Homes and Communities which provides further information on libraries.

8.43

Cork Public Museum is the oldest local authority museum in the country, having served the people of Cork and beyond for over 75 years. Museums can be spaces that promote greater social interaction and cohesion, encouraging intercultural and intergenerational dialogue which builds social capital and, thus, benefits the entire community. The 2018 report, Culture and Local Development: Maximizing the Impact - Guide for Local Governments, Communities and Museums, by the International Council of Museums and the OECD, emphasises the potential museums have to act as agents of social and economic change as they generate knowledge for and about society, are a place for social interaction and dialogue, and a source of creativity and innovation for the local economy. Cork City Council will seek to increase audience engagement with the museum, especially within the local community, leading to the improvement of accessibility to collections, becoming a regional centre for education and learning and improved social outreach.

To protect and reinforce the unique character and built fabric of the city,  towns, villages, suburbs, neighbourhoods and places that make up the fabric of Cork City, both the character derived from the natural environment and the man-made character created by the built form. This will be achieved by protecting Protected Structures, archaeological monuments, and archaeological heritage and Architectural Conservation Areas, while providing opportunities for new development that respects the rich and historic built heritage of the City.

To identify, protect, enhance and promote Cork’s unique cultural heritage and expression in an authentic and meaningful way. To foster and support the arts and culture in Cork City by encouraging new and improved facilities and by ensuring that arts and culture infrastructure are integrated into large-scale developments on key sites.  To support the development of a vibrant cultural and creative sector in the City as a key enabler of innovation, placemaking and community development throughout the City.

To support the role of Cork City as a significant domestic and international tourism destination and support the sustainable use and development of the City’s tourism assets.

To ensure that elements of archaeological, architectural and cultural heritage significance are identified, retained and interpreted wherever possible and the knowledge placed in the public domain.

Proposals for new development must have regard to the historic built heritage of the City, particularly Protected Structures, archaeological monuments and heritage and Architectural Conservation Areas, and any development that has a detrimental impact on these assets will not normally be acceptable.

Objective 8.1

 

Objective 8.2

Strategic Archaeology
Objective

a. To protect and preserve archaeological monuments as listed in the Sites and Monuments Record (SMR), Record of Monuments and Places (RMP) and the Wreak Inventory of Ireland Database (WIID). All sites can be accessed on the Historic Environment Viewer (www.archaeology.ie). The National Monuments Service will be informed of all development proposals which relate to Sites and Zones of Archaeological Interest.
b. Cork City Council will have regard to the relevant national statutory policies and guidelines, including Frameworks and Principles for the Protection of the Archaeological Heritage and to Best Practice Guidance published by the Heritage Council and the Institute of Archaeologists of Ireland.
c. To preserve the character and setting of the medieval city wall and defences, which is a National Monument, according to the recommendations of the Cork City Walls Management Plan (2007) and the National Policy on Town Defences (2008).
d. To promote the retention, reuse, and enhancement of buildings and other elements of architectural, archaeological and other significance.
e. To ensure that development reflects and is sensitive to the historical importance and character of the city and its hinterland, in particular the street layout and pattern, plot sizes, building heights and scales.
f. To improve and encourage access to and understanding of the architectural and archaeological heritage of the City.

 

Protection of the
Archaeological Resource

a. Cork City Council will protect and enhance the archaeological value of the sites (and their settings) listed in the Record of Monuments and Places (RMP) and the Historic Environment Viewer.
b. Cork City Council will ensure that development proposals will protect and preserve archaeological sites discovered since the publication of the Record of Monuments and Places (RMP).
c. To ensure the preservation of archaeological remains in-situ In accordance with national policy (and in the interests of sustainability) impacts on the buried archaeological environment should be avoided where possible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Objective 8.3

 

Objective 8.4

The Value of
Archaeological
Knowledge

To require that all appropriate archaeological excavation should be undertaken to the highest possible standards and the information made publicly available. The acquisition and dissemination of knowledge is a core principle for the protection of the archaeological heritage of the city. Cork City Council will endeavour to ensure public dissemination through publications and public lectures.

 

Protection of the
Medieval Historic Core

a. Where development is proposed within the medieval historic core a policy of minimising the impact on the archaeological resource will be promoted. Any proposed development will be assessed on the level and amount of undisturbed archaeology present on the site.
b. Cork City Council will seek to protect Cork’s medieval street pattern, and in particular, seek to conserve and enhance the laneways within the setting of the streetscape.
c. Development proposals will seek to retain historic building lines and traditional plot widths where they derive from medieval origins. The physical integrity of the medieval core should be respected through the retention of plot sizes which can be achieved by the refurbishment of existing buildings.

 

     
 

Objective 8.5

 

Objective 8.6

Protection of Cork’s
Medieval City Wall and
Defences

a. Cork City Council will ensure preservation in-situ of the Medieval City Wall and Defences and will have regard to the preservation and enhancement of the line of the City Wall when considering development proposals in its vicinity. Disturbance, removal and alteration of the line of the City Wall will not be permitted. An appropriate buffer zone between the City Wall and the development will also be required.
b. Cork City Council will seek to improve public awareness and increase knowledge and appreciation of the medieval city walls.

 

Protection of Burial
Grounds

Cork City Council will seek to preserve and enhance burial grounds and their settings. Development in and adjacent to these areas will be limited. Where former burial grounds are in use as amenity spaces then their retention for passive recreational use will be required.

     
 

Objective 8.7

 

Objective 8.8

Industrial Archaeology

Cork City Council requires that all development proposals for industrial buildings and sites of industrial archaeological importance be accompanied by an archaeological assessment of the building(s) and their surrounding environment. Retention and /or incorporation of industrial buildings will be encouraged. Where in exceptional circumstances demolition is permitted, a detailed building report will be required.

 

Underwater Archaeology

Cork City Council requires that all development proposals which will impact on marine, riverine, lacustrine, intertidal/sub-tidal environments, and areas of former reclaimed land, shall be subject to appropriate archaeological assessment.

     
 

Objective 8.9

 

Objective 8.10

Preservation of
Archaeology within
Open Space in
Developments

In development proposals where archaeology is to be retained in-situ the archaeological remains will be protected, safeguarded and where suitable, be interpreted in an accessible manner. Where the archaeology being preserved is located in open space, then this will be in addition to the overall open space provisions.

 

Archaeological
Management Strategy
for the City

a. Cork City Council will seek to prepare and implement conservation and management plans for National Monuments and Recorded Monuments in Cork City Council Ownership.
b. Cork City Council will seek to develop an archaeological strategy for the city, to include management and protection of strategic research locations.
c. Cork City Council will seek to develop an archaeological GIS for archaeological investigations undertaken in the city.
d. Cork City Council will seek to ensure that the tourism strategy within medieval historic core and in area/setting of historic monuments should draw on its archaeological heritage and should reflect a strong and authentic sense of place.

     
 

Objective 8.11

 

Objective 8.12

Strategic Arts and
Culture Objective

a. To celebrate Cork as a city of culture and to support the further development of Cork as a centre for arts, culture and creativity.
b. To grow Cork’s cultural capacity by retaining and attracting creative practitioners to live and work in Cork.
c. To support the continued advancement, participation and collaboration of arts and cultural services through the implementation of the forthcoming Cork City Arts Strategy (2021 – 2025).
d. To creatively engage citizens in shaping Cork’s cultural identity through implementation of the Creative Cork Strategy 2018 – 2022 and its successors.
e. To ensure that the nurturing of the arts and associated services is part of the planned development of Cork City and its urban and rural neighbourhoods.
f. To protect and enhance the cultural amenities of the city including the conservation, protection and enhancement of Cork City’s natural, built and cultural heritage.
g. To ensure the preservation and promotion of the cultural identity of Cork’s urban and rural city neighbourhoods.

 

Cork as a City of Culture

To celebrate Cork as a city of culture and to support the further development of Cork as a centre for arts, culture and creativity; Cork City Council will aim to further expand and improve on the provision of such facilities and consider cultural provision in development management.

     
 

Objective 8.13

 

Objective 8.14

Cork’s Cultural Capacity

To grow Cork’s cultural capacity by retaining and attracting creative practitioners to live and work in Cork. To this end Cork City Council will seek to:
a. Ensure that cultural facilities are not lost from existing buildings in redevelopment proposals i.e. where the redevelopment of sites/buildings which include an existing cultural facility is proposed that this facility is replicated/re-housed in the new development.
b. Support the development of vacant premises and sites in the City Centre for arts and cultural uses.
c. Support the development of infrastructure for artists including spaces for artists to live, work and exhibit.
d. Ensure the retention and facilitation of artistic/design based educational institutions in the City.

 

Cork City Arts Strategy

To support the continued advancement, participation and collaboration of arts and cultural services through the implementation of the Cork City Arts Strategy (2021 – 2025).

     
 

Objective 8.15

 

Objective 8.16

Creative Cork Strategy

To creatively engage citizens in shaping Cork’s cultural identity through implementation of the Creative Cork Strategy 2018 – 2022 Cork City Council will seek to:
a. Invest in long term engagement in creative collaboration.
b. Recognise youth culture as a creative force and an art form for Cork City.
c. Creatively engage our citizens in Archaeology, built, natural and cultural heritage.
d. Creatively use our public space for our communities through one large scale cultural public event each year.
e. Recognise Cork City as an intercultural city.
f. Recognise the contribution of Cork creatives to Cork’s identity as a city of culture.

 

Arts and the Public Realm

To ensure that the nurturing of the arts and associated services is part of the planned development of Cork City and its urban and rural neighbourhoods and to enhance the cultural use of public realm spaces, Cork City Council will:
a. Stimulate cultural activity in Cork’s public spaces including greater use of empty premises and outdoor spaces.
b. Prioritise high-quality, design-led approaches to public realm enhancement.
c. Provide for cultural and family uses in planning of public realm development projects.
d. Observe principles of placemaking in public realm development projects.
e. Implement the Arts Strategy for Cork Docklands Public Realm as part of the Docklands Development
f. Protect and enhance built heritage through development for cultural uses where necessary, appropriate and feasible.
g. Continue to promote and encourage the provision of public art in large scale developments, in public parks and other public spaces.
h. Ensure that all construction projects undertaken by Cork City Council which are supported by Government funding are considered for the ‘Per cent for Art’  Scheme.

 

Objective 8.17

 

Objective 8.18

Conservation of the
City’s Built Heritage

a. To seek to ensure the conservation of Cork City’s built heritage.
b. To ensure that Cork’s Built Heritage contributes fully to the social and economic life of the city and to pursue actions that ensure Cork’s built heritage will benefit from good custodianship and building occupation.

 

Reuse & Refurbishment
Historic Buildings

a. The City Council will actively encourage the re-use of historic buildings in the interests of conservation and environmental sustainability to minimise waste and optimise on the embodied energy in existing buildings.
b. Uses which will have a minimal impact on the character of historic structures will be encouraged.
c. Alterations will adhere to best practice conservation standards.
d. The reinstatement of lost features and removal of unsympathetic additions will be encouraged where appropriate.
e. It is recognised that the protection and retention of historic buildings within the medieval city, has the dual advantage of protecting the rich archaeological resource and the Recorded Monument of the City Wall.

     
 

Objective 8.19

 

Objective 8.20

Record of Protected
Structures

To maintain a Record of Protected Structures (RPS) which shall include structures or parts of structures which are of special architectural, historical, archaeological, artistic, cultural, scientific, social or technical interest, and which it is an objective to protect.
a. Any changes or alterations to the character of a Protected Structure which would in the opinion of Cork City Council, have a material effect on the character of the structure, will require planning permission.
b. Cork City Council will have regard to the relevant statutory guidance issue by the central government department responsible for the built heritage, including the Architectural heritage protection, guidelines for planning authorities.
c. Proposals for demolition of a Protected Structure shall not be permitted except in exceptional circumstances and where it can be shown that a greater public interest will be served which outweighs the loss to the architectural heritage.
d. Any alteration or demolition of a Protected Structure shall require the preparation of a full drawn and photographic record to Best Conservation Practice.
e. A broad range of uses will be considered for the regeneration / reuse of protected structures that are derelict / underutilised.
f. Where the planning authority accepts the principle of demolition a detailed written and photographic inventory of the building will be made and sent to the Cork City & County Archives and the Irish Architectural Archive for record purposes. g. Where a planning application is being granted for development within the curtilage of a Protected Structure, the conservation of the protected structure will be prioritised as the first phase of the development to prevent endangerment, abandonment and dereliction.

 

Historic Landscapes

Cork City Council will ensure that the designated and undesignated historic landscapes and gardens throughout the city are protected from inappropriate development and enhanced where possible.

 

 

 

 

Objective 8.21

 

Objective 8.22

Enabling Development

To allow for the enabling of development Cork City Council will consider permitting the following, notwithstanding the zoning objectives of the area:
a. The restoration of a Protected Structure, or other buildings of architectural or other merit, currently in poor condition, to conservation best practice for any purpose compatible with the character of the building.
b. The conservation of a Protected Structure or other building of architectural or other merit, independently of its current condition for a range of potential uses such as tourism, social, cultural amenity as a priority, or housing and business uses as a secondary potential use, in cases where, in Cork City Council’s opinion, that the converted building is capable of functioning as an important additional tourist attraction or facility, and the use is compatible with the character of the building
c. Cork City Council will promote by whatever means it considers most appropriate the temporary or short-term use, in particular arts, community or tourist uses, of vacant or underused structures or sites of built heritage interest for any use which is compatible with the character of the structure or site.

 

National Inventory of
Architectural Heritage
(NIAH)

Cork City Council will have regard to Ministerial recommendations to the City Council to consider the designation of the buildings and gardens listed in the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage as Protected Structures, Cork City Council will consider the structures listed in the NIAH for protection, by designation of Protected Structures, by the adoption of Architectural Conservation Areas to protect groups of buildings, or by whatever other means the Council considers will most effectively protect the architectural heritage of the City. These Ministerial Recommendations will be taken into account when the Cork City Council is considering proposals for development that would affect the historic or architectural interest of these structures. Cork City Council will seek to engage with key stakeholder groups, including public representatives, building owners and the public to develop the most appropriate response for the protection of specific buildings, groups of buildings and historic areas.

     
 

Objective 8.23

 

Objective 8.24

Development in
Architectural Conservation
Areas

Development in Architectural Conservation Areas should have regard to the following:
a. Works that impact negatively upon features within the public realm, such as stone setts, cobbles or other historic paving, railings, street furniture, stone kerbing etc. shall not be generally permitted.
b. Design and detailing that responds respectfully to the historic environment in a way that contributes new values from our own time. This can be achieved by considering layout, scale, materials and finishes and patterns such as plot divisions in the surrounding area.
c. Historic materials and methods of construction should be retained and repaired where this is reasonable, e.g. historic windows and doors, original roof coverings, metal rainwater goods should be retained along with original forms and locations of openings etc.
d. Repairs or the addition of new materials should be appropriate and in keeping with the character of the original structures.

 

Demolition in
Architectural Conservation
Areas

Demolition of structures and parts of structures will in principle only be permitted in an Architectural Conservation Area where the structure, or parts of a structure, are considered not to contribute to the special or distinctive character, or where the replacement structure would significantly enhance the special character more than the retention of the original structure.

 

 

 

 

Objective 8.25

 

Objective 8.26

Recording of
Structures in Architectural
Conservation Areas

Where in exceptional circumstances a structure or a part of a structure which is considered to contribute to the special character of the area, is permitted to be demolished, it should first be recorded in drawn and photographic form prior to demolition, and where appropriate should be monitored during demolition. The building record should be lodged with the Cork City & County Archives and with the Irish Architectural Archive in addition to the requirements of planning permission conditions.

 

Historic Street Character
Areas

Cork City Council will protect the physical and architectural character of historic street character areas, avoiding insensitive alterations or change of use which would detract from their character, and will seek the provision of high quality public realm treatments in these areas to reflect their social value to the City.

     
 

Objective 8.27

 

Objective 8.28

Individual Buildings of
Character in Suburban
Areas and Villages

There will be a presumption against the demolition of such structures of vernacular or historic / social interest which contribute to the character and identity of an area. Their re-use will be prioritised.

 

Elements of Built Heritage

Cork City Council will ensure the protection of important elements of the built heritage and their settings as appropriate.

     
 

Objective 8.29

 

Objective 8.30

Separate Access to the
Upper Floors of Buildings

In order to ensure the continued use of uppers floors above ground floor commercial uses, there will be a presumption against the loss of access to the upper floors of buildings from street frontages, Cork City Council will seek the reinstatement of upper floor access points wherever possible from the street.

 

Historic Town Centre Supports

To advance the provision of collaborative supports for Historic Town Centres in Cork City, including the Collaborative Town Centre Health Check (CTCHC) Programme recently established by the Heritage Council.

         

 

 

Maintain and Protect our Built Heritage
Do not allow our historic Quays to be destroyed by the OPW. Improve grants for people to repair older houses, that they are living in. Conserve what is left of historic buildings...
Sense of the City
Using the old proverb 'take care of the pennies and the pounds will take care of themselves' comes to mind when I wander around Cork City. It has the potential to be a wonderfully vibrant city...
Science Museum
As a scientist, immunologist, lecturer in UCC and above all of these a parent, I feel this is a huge opportunity to occupy a space much neglected in Ireland which would be to establish a Science...